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Do you “like” us?


If you enjoy following the library on this “Library Hubbub” blog, check out the Burlington Public Library on Facebook.

You’ll find us at http://www.facebook.com/BurlingtonPublicLibraryWA . Then just select “like” and you’ll be able to keep tabs on what’s going on at the Burlington Public Library: Burlington’s (online) Hub for Information and Ideas.

It’s just one more way to find out what’s happening @ your library.

~Janice

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Your “Unquiet” Library

Get ready for a little Music in the Stacks at your library this coming Saturday, November 13. From 2 pm to 3 pm, Tom Rigney (the Lone Blues Man) will be performing an hour of blues harmonica and guitar music.

The inscription over the door of the Library at Thebes read “Medicine for the Soul.”
Come to the Burlington Public Library this Saturday for some Music for the Soul.

 ~Janice

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Is it art? Is it a novel? When comics grow up.

What has:
   —
gorgeous illustrations on every page
   — a beginning, middle, and end
   — thoughtful content meant for adult understanding?

They’re called graphic novels.  They are everywhere, and growing in popularity, and if you’re dismissing them as “comics” or “just for kids,” you are making a grievous error and shorting yourself.

For instance, next time you’re in the library, pick up one of these and page through it.  See if, like me, you’re intrigued and engaged by the beautiful art and powerful messages of these novels.

The Arrival, by Shaun Tan, is a novel without words — literately.   It is the most powerful story about immigration I’ve ever read, and Tan does it by inventing a completely new world in which to explore the concept.  Because the reader cannot attach his or her ideas to a particular American ethnicity’s experience, she or he are free to experience the book in a whole new way.

Then there’s Maus, a set of two graphic novels which are early classics in this young genre.  The art here is stark and messy, which is appropriate because the topic is the Holocaust.  The author, Art Speilgman, won countless awards for this book, which is on one level the story of a narrator interviewing his aging father, who was a concentration camp survivor.  On another level, the narrator becomes so involved in the story that he draws an ongoing cartoon of a terrible conflict between cats and mice.

The variety of graphic novels these days is awesome.  They are published for every age level.  They include biographies (we have one of Nelson Mandela), history (we have Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi, a two-volume novel of her experiences growing up in Iraq), and issues from the tragic to the light-hearted (look at The Tale of One Bad Rat, by Bryan Talbot; Another Chance To Get It Right, by Andrew Vachess; and Pride of Baghdad, by Brian K. Vaughn.

Let me know what you think!
                                –Mary Beth

 

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Are you a LitLover?

The web is soooooo full of book-loving resources.  Here’s one you might like to visit: LitLovers.  You can find a book and read a review. There’s great information about starting a book group, for adults or kids.  There are book club discussion guides for specific books.

And there are “LitCourses.”  If you want to get “more” out of your reading — if you’re nagged by all that talk in English classes from long ago, about themes and metaphors and symbolism and whatnot — or if you just enjoy some extra education, take a look at these offerings.

There are ten of them, from how to read “deeply” to deepening your awareness of plot, characters, and point of view (as well as, naturally, theme and symbolism).  They’re self-guided and contain a piece of work to read that pertains to that unit’s focus.

It’s fall!  I always feel a tug towards going back to school, this time of year.  Indulge yourself with a bit of literature-loving, and let us know if it expands your reading horizons.
                               —Mary Beth

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Time to “Fall Back”

This coming Sunday, November 7, it’s time to Fall Back, and reset our clocks to standard time. Did you know that Benjamin Franklin first suggested the idea of Daylight Saving Time in an essay titled An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light.  The essay was first published in the Journal de Paris in April 1784. But it wasn’t until more than a century later that an Englishman, William Willett, suggested the idea again in 1907.

To learn more about Daylight Savings Time, its history, and why we use it, go to: http://www.energy.ca.gov/daylightsaving.html, a website from the California Energy Commission.

And don’t forget your smoke detector. The Burlington Fire Department urges you to “Change Your Clock, Change Your Batteries” as part of the Operation Save-A-Life fire safety campaign, now in its 7th year.

~Janice

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Calling all volunteer seamstresses

 

"The Seamstress," by N. DeJong

We’ve never tried to recruit volunteers from the blog before, but hey, why not?

We have a need, we have readers, perhaps we’ll find a match.

We’re looking for a seamstress to complete a one-time project for us, a series of identical curtains roughly 3 ft x 3 ft, with a very slight gather.  If you’ve got the talent and the time, we’d sure appreciate it, and you’ll be contributing to the beauty of our bee-youuu-te-ful library. 

For more information, please call Mary Beth at 755-0760.  And thanks!  Volunteers make our world go ’round.


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Websites for Voter Info

 Though we don’t tell people HOW to vote, we can help you find information to help YOU decide how to vote.  In addition to books on controversial or public interest issues, search our newspaper, magazine and social policy databases for information on controversial issues for historical context and background of topics. See our Government, Law & Social Policy Reference page for additional resources on public policy, legal and government issues.

And here are a few handy websites to help you prepare for this election:

For information on the process of registering to vote and actually voting in Washington state, visit Vote411.org.

And finally, for unbiased information on candidates, campaigns and ballot measures, there’s Washington Voter.

So now you don’t have any excuses!  And if you have other questions about voting, you know where to come.
                                  –Karen

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We’re still reading

You may be aware of the hot debates going on these days over the future of the printed book.  Many grim prophecies that physical books will be disappearing in our near future, as technology continues on its merry way.

Well, it turns out that these concerns have been around awhile – at least from the early 1960s – and here is proof.  Watch this short, charming video from a Jack Gilford ode to the book (and to reading) from that time.    

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUlC8irmsgE]

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The Eating Season

Earlier this week we celebrated a staff birthday with yummy Pumpkin Pie Bars. Cut them in dessert size portions, add a squirt of whip cream, and it’s a great alternative for anyone who’s reluctant to go to all the work of rolling out dough for a pumpkin pie.

With the holiday season fast approaching (or as it’s known at my house: The Eating Season), check out the great selection of cookbooks @ your library for a new recipe, or maybe a new twist on an old favorite. Here are a few options: Sweet Alternative, Pie, Pie, Pie, and The All-American Dessert Book.
 

We subscribe to several cooking and food magazines as well, like: Bon Appétit, Cooking Light, Cook’s Illustrated, Taste of Home, and Weight Watchers.

Bon Appétit, and I’ll let you know when one of the staff cooks up another tasty creation.

~Janice

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Out with the old, in with the new

The Fall Friends of the Library Used Book Sale is almost upon us.

Sale Hours:
Friday, October 22 from 1pm to 6pm
Saturday, October 23 from 10am to 3pm

So it’s time to clean out your book shelves, and make room for more books! We are accepting donations of “gently used” books and media (DVDs, CDs, etc.) through next Friday, October 15. No textbooks, please.

Once you’ve cleared out space on your books shelves, you’ll be ready to come shopping for something new to read. You’re going to find some great bargains at the Used Book Sale–most books are priced under $1.00, and children’s books are only 25¢!

All the money raised at the sale supports library programming and collections, so it’s a win-win event. Support your local library while you stock up on some good reads.

~Janice

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