Tag Archives: internet

Cats on the Internet

Finally, an infographic researching one of the great mysteries of our age: why cats have taken over the Internet.

Now what we need is an infographic researching why we love infographics.

Click below and learn.

Picture1

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Websites for Kids

We’re all aware of how much kids love anything to do with computers.

This can create concern for parents, who don’t always have time to research the best websites for their kids to use.  Here’s a handy resource: The Association for Library Service to Children researches and vets hundreds of sites, and publishes the best of them on (what else) a website: Great Websites for Kids.

The websites evaluated are aimed at children 14 years and younger.  The ratings include a grade level,  a rating system of five stars, and details such as any fees or purchases available on the site.   The ALSC adds sites three times a year, and reviews all the sites twice a year for relevancy and accessibility.

One other nifty resource on their site is their Selection Criteria page, on which they share just what they look for in a site that makes it credible and worthwhile.  Parents looking to learn how to evaluate the websites their children visit might find this page very useful.

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Filed under Early literacy, Internet

Speaking of civil liberties…

You may notice something funny about the internet today.

Here’s what Google looks like:

And Wikipedia:

So what’s up?  If you care about your Internet access, you’ll want to be informed about SOPA and PIPA, two proposed national legislations in the news currently.  And here, courtesy of The Rumpus, is a great list of options for educating yourself in your preferred tone of voice.  (I especially appreciate the inclusion of LOLCat, but that’s just me.)

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“You don’t need to be a tech nerd to want to know what’s up with the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its counterpart the Protect IP Act (PIPA), so here are some links to help you understand SOPA/PIPA and today’s blackout.  After those links you’ll find a few to help you take action, if you so choose.

If you want to go to the source and read the actual House legislation, here’s a pdf for SOPA.
Similarly, if you want the actual Senate legislation, here’s a pdf for PIPA.

If you want something that summarizes SOPA/PIPA and the Wikipedia blackout, here’s a very basic understanding from ABC News.

If you want CBS News to explain what it believes you need to know on the issue, here’s that summary.

If you want FOX News to explain it to you in its own special way, here’s that link.

If you want the New York Times to explain it to you, you know where to go.

If you want an incredibly specific website to explain SOPA, try here.

If you want to read Obama’s Administration’s response, read this.

If you want a daily technology news website’s take, visit Wired.com‘s explanation of why it went dark today.

If you still don’t understand how SOPA/PIPA might affect you, try reading this CNET article for an FAQ.

If you require a lolcat connection, then watch “The Day the LOLcats died” video.

If you can only function in internet lists mainly composed of graphics, then check out the Washington Post’s collection of the five best anti-SOPA protests from today’s blackout.

Now, as far as taking action goes…

If you’re looking to contact your officials, you visit their websites for direct contact information.  You can call their offices or you can send an email.  Or both.

  • Visit Congress’s website and type your zip code in to the box at the top right: http://www.house.gov/
  • Visit the Senate’s website and use the drop-down state selection at the top right: http://www.senate.gov/

If you want to sign the Google petition, go here: https://www.google.com/landing/takeaction/

If you want to sign the petition on sopa.com, it’s as easy as going to: http://www.sopa.com/

The Rumpus

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