Category Archives: Internet

Hacked Email – What to do?

HackedemailFTCClick here for help and updates on how to prevent being hacked by a scammer – Information from the Federal Trade Commission Blog

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Filed under Consumer Info, Government, Information literacy, Internet, Tech

Learning at the Library in 2015

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Each January the Burlington Public Library renews subscriptions to over 20 different online resources for research. These databases (we call them) complement our book collections on popular information topics. The resources are usually special websites that are accessible in the library or at home with your library card. The sites provide non-commercial (no pop-ups) private access to back issues of magazines, scholarly journals and newspapers. They also include online access to well written and edited special interest encyclopedias and information resources.

Examples include:
• Telephone and business directory type information – AtoZdatabases
• Practice tests for career and educational training – Testing & Education Reference Center
• Language learning – Pronunciator
• Consumer and product information – Ebsco and Proquest
• Legal self-help books and articles – Legal Information Reference Center

These are designed to provide the most reliable and factual information from a variety of points of views for students and the general public.

So the next time you get frustrated with your Google search or want an alternative to Wikipedia, try the Burlington Public Library.

Ask Us!
blibrary@burlingtonwa.gov
burlingtonwa.gov/library
or 360-755-0760

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Filed under Business, Databases, Internet, Language

Zombie Awareness Month: Final post

Zombie sillhouetteThis is our final post in our May Zombie Awareness Month blog series.  Each Thursday this month, we brought you ways to celebrate and learn about all things Zombie using resources from your library.  If you want to see other posts in this series, here’s the whole series on one page.

This week, I just wanted to point out that you can find zombie book selections and more on our Zombie Pinboard on Pinterest.  If you haven’t used Pinterest before, it is a fun new social networking site where you can group pictures and other stuff together on virtual pinboards.  Feel free to explore our other pinboards as well, or check out What Are You Reading?, a pinboard where librarians from across the country pin information about their current reads.

Even though Zombie Awareness Month is drawing to a close, remember that the library is happy to help find an answer to any of your questions, zombie-related or not.  Call us at (360) 755-0760, email us at blibrary@ci.burlington.wa.us, or just stop by!

-Jane

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Cats on the Internet

Finally, an infographic researching one of the great mysteries of our age: why cats have taken over the Internet.

Now what we need is an infographic researching why we love infographics.

Click below and learn.

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Filed under Internet

Random or reliable?

 

internet vs. database

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Filed under BPL services, Databases, Internet, Libraries

State of the Internet

Well, if you’re reading this, you’re an invested participant of the Internet.  Here’s a fascinating “state of the Internet” video from Mashable’s SXSW (South x Southwest, an annual film, movie, and interactive conference held in Austin, Texas) keynote.

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From it’s humble beginnings in 1969, the Internet has developed so quickly that no one has a handle on it.  Should we regulate it?  Where is it going?  Fasten your seatbelt and watch this short video for some astounding facts and forecasts.

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Filed under Intellectual freedom, Internet

Ask a question, any question

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Well hold on to your hats, friends: it’s International Ask a Question Day.
From a library point of view, this is fairly irresistible to point out, because it is scandalous how many people do not know that libraries answer questions.  For free.  Really!  We call them reference questions, and people train for years to get good at answering whatever questions are tossed their way, from homework help to just plain curiosity.

Libraries are so devoted to this practice that most of them are available 24/7 to do it.   If you look in the upper right quadrant of our home page, you’ll find a link called Ask a Librarian under “Quick Links.”  Any time of day, you can chat online with a live librarian and get help getting the information you need.

It turns out the Ask a Question Day folks are not promoting library reference service, although they certainly should.  But it’s an interesting concept: the idea that the questions you ask, and how you ask them, can have remarkable impact on your life, relationships, job, and happiness.  They coin the term “questioning skills.”

Perhaps not so coincidentally, today is also Albert Einstein’s birthday.  He is widely attributed as the source of the quote ““The important thing is not to stop questioning.”

So I can’t refrain myself from asking:  what are the important questions of your life, and where do you go to get them answered?  Just remember: we’ve got your back.

–Mary Beth

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Teens and the library

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Got teens?  Read this!

We’re in the middle of Teen Tech Week, a national celebration which goes from March 8-16.  Any teen between the ages of 13 to 19 can participate by creating a book trailer:  a commercial (three minutes or less) that tempts its audience to read your favorite book.  There are fabulous prizes: a Sony Bloggie video camera; a $25 Amazon gift card; and $15 in Fandango Bucks.

To participate, teens can pick up an entry blank, which also has rules and resources on it.  The deadline for submission is up to our 5:00 closing on Saturday, March 16.

Teen Tech Week is sponsored by YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association). On their website they describe it thusly:

“Teens’ use of technology increased dramatically in recent years, yet more teens are doing this from home instead of the library. The Pew Internet & American Life project found that 93 percent of teens go online, with many using social networking sites, finding news and information, sharing content they create, and looking for information on health.

Teens need to know that the library is a trusted resource for accessing information and that librarians are the experts who can help them develop the skills they need to use electronic resources effectively and efficiently. Teen Tech Week is a national initiative sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association and is aimed at teens, their parents, educators and other concerned adults. The purpose of the initiative is to ensure that teens are competent and ethical users of technologies, especially those that are offered through libraries such as DVDs, databases, audiobooks, and videogames.”

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Filed under Books, Celebrations & holidays, Internet, Reading, Teen programs

Are you a green reader?

It’s tough to love both the environment and reading.  According to www.ecolibris.net (which is a charity that raises funds to offset carbon costs due to reading), 20 million trees are cut down every year to make paper for trees.  And would you believe every sheet of paper takes 13 ounces of water to make it so white?

The big question is, does digital reading decrease the environmental impact of publishing  and transporting over a million new books a year in this country alone?  It’s controversial, of course, and hard to measure – only Apple publishes the carbon footprint of its devices.

In general, researchers agree that if you’re only measuring reading itself, e-devices are WAY more green.  But if you include the carbon emissions required to produce the iPad or Nook or Kindle or whatever, the situation reverses: print books are the way to go.

But that’s based on the average adult reading rate in this country, which is, alarmingly, 6.5 books a year.  For those who read a lot, the equation changes.

Here’s the New York Times’ bottom line, taking into account the mining, production, use, and recycling impact of an e-device:

“So, how many volumes do you need to read on your e-reader to break even? With respect to fossil fuels, water use and mineral consumption, the impact of one e-reader payback equals roughly 40 to 50 books. When it comes to global warming, though, it’s 100 books; with human health consequences, it’s somewhere in between.

All in all, the most ecologically virtuous way to read a book starts by walking to your local library.”

Well said, NYT!   What do you think?

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Filed under Books, E-books, Internet

Jellybooks

Here’s a neat resource for all you e-book lovers.  Jellybooks calls itself a “discovery service” — they don’t sell e-books, but they help readers discover e-books they’d like to read.

jellybooks

Not only can you discover new books you’re interested in, but you can also download 10% of the book to determine if you really like it; Jellybeans saves all your samples for you and multiple downloads are allowed.  If you want a book, Jellybooks gives you links to purchase the books at your choice of stores.

There are some other neat features, too – a creative way to get books at a 50% discount (see this page), and ways to share your discoveries with friends.

And don’t forget: you can download e-books and audiobooks from the library for free!  Just ask us how, or visit www.anytime.lib.wa.us.

Happy reading,
Mary Beth

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Filed under Books, E-books, Internet, Reading