Category Archives: Art

Seattle Sketcher visits Burlington

In case you missed it, the Seattle Times Artist Illustrator Gabriel Campanario was in Burlington recently and created sketches of two of our historic buildings, the Old City Hall and the Carnegie Library and the new Chamber Information Center designed as a historic railroad station.  See his sketches here.  The article was published in the Saturday Oct 1 2016 issue.

 

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Filed under Art, Burlington, History

The ducks have landed!

2012-2013jrduckstamp150dpi

Every year (for the past 20+ years!) the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sponsors an art competition to select an image for Federal Junior Duck Stamp–a collectible stamp that is sold to support youth conservation education programs.

K – 12 students from all over the country submit “duck art” for their state’s competition; then first, second, and third place winners are selected in each age group. The “Best of Show” is selected to compete in the national Junior Duck Stamp Design Contest.

For the next month or so we have 24 of the paintings that were submitted for this year’s state competition–including the best of show winner that went on to the national competition. Come in and check them out–they are pretty amazing, and beautiful.

For more information on the Junior Duck stamp program go to: www.fws.gov/juniorduck 

And here’s this year’s winner: duck stamp art winner

 

~Janice

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Filed under Art, Libraries

Sundance rides again

It’s time for the Sundance Film Festival, and this year you can be part of it.  This 35th year anniversary runs  from January 17 to the 27th.  According to Wikipedia, it’s one of the largest independent film festivals in the United States; last year, there were over 46,700 attendees.  It’s certainly one of the most famous festivals, helped no doubt by its close association with Robert Redford.

It started as a way to focus the spotlight on independent filmmakers.  Now it’s a media extravaganza of movies, music, and celebrities, but it continues to bring to light movies that go on to great acclaim.  In the past, those have included Garden StateThe Blair Witch Project, Spanking the Monkey, Reservoir DogsLittle Miss Sunshine, El Mariachi, Moon, Clerks, Thank You for Smoking, Sex, Lies, and Videotape, The Brothers McMullen, Napoleon Dynamite, God Grew Tired of Us, Quinceañera and Precious.

You can watch 13 different short films entered in the competition from this YouTube link.  The festival’s website streams some things live; and here’s an article about other ways you can participate from afar.

After that, come in and see if we’ve purchased the prize winners for your viewing pleasure!

 

 

 

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Filed under Art, DVD, Internet

For the book-loving voyeur

Do you enjoy the odd, harmless bit of voyeurism?  When in a friend’s house, do you scan their bookshelves?

If so, here’s a book-lover’s website for your enjoyment: the Underground New York Public Library, which is not a library at all, it turns out, but a collection of photographs.

It’s by Ourit Ben-Haim, who describes the project: “The Underground New York Public Library is a photo series featuring the Reading-Riders of the NYC subways. The photos come together as a visual library. This library freely lends out a reminder that we’re capable of traveling to great depths within ourselves and as a whole.”

I find the result delightful.  It captures an interesting vulnerability of people reading.  What they are reading, and what or who surrounds them, often creates a juxtaposition. A new one is posted each weekday; you may find yourself returning to this site!  An active community has developed there, commenting on the photos, finding synchronicities, and telling the stories of some of the photographs.

A fun site to explore, and to relish the simple sight of people reading.
–Mary Beth

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Filed under Art, Books, Internet, Reading

“The book is always better than the movie.”

What do you think: is the book always better than the movie?  That’s kind of a “chicken or the egg?” question for book lovers.

A bunch of movies coming out this summer come from books – The Bourne Legacy, Savages, The Intouchables, What to Expect When You’re Expecting, and Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days, to name a few.   But there are some movies I never realized were based on books.  I mean, Rambo????  Who knew?   See more examples here and gain fascinating trivia with which to impress your friends.

And tell us, what’s your call: book first?  Movie first?

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Filed under Art, Books, Movies

Come in and play!

The children’s area here at the library has been transformed into an “interactive learning space.” That just means that there are now some very cool new things to play with. The library was a construction zone all day Thursday during the installation, and now there’s a tractor, flying geese, and lots of things that spin or otherwise move when they encounter little fingers.

Construction Zone. Do Not Enter!

Building a tractor.

Come play!

So come on in and play! Bring your children, your grandchildren, or your inner-child. We’re planning a program and open house to celebrate the installation on Thursday, August 23–watch for more details on that.

~Janice

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Filed under Art, Early literacy

What’s in a word

Etymology is the study of the history and evolution of words, phrases, and slangs.  It’s an ology that’s actually fun, in this nerd’s opinion. 

For instance, aren’t you curious about the origins of the words gargantuan, cyberspace, yahoo, chortle, nerd, and bumpTake a look here to find out.

And here’s one of my favorite Shakespearean references: look at all these phrases attributed to the Bard!   (At least by this source; I’m not sure of its credibility, but isn’t it fun?)
–Mary Beth

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Walk to the corner of Bitter and Sweet

Have you read the best-selling book Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet?   Long a favorite of book groups, this love story by Jamie Ford takes us to 1940’s Seattle and the Japanese internment camps.

If you’re a fan, you might enjoy knowing that the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience has developed a walking tour of Seattle’s Chinatown, which visits places the characters lived.  All you true fans, put on your walking shoes and taste some history.   The tours are Saturdays at 1:00 pm, and the price includes admission to the museum.

 

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Listen to a play

Here’s something new and different: you can listen to a live play.  This sound recording features an all-star cast — George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Martin Sheen, Jamie Lee Curtis, to name just a few — and was directed by Rob Reiner.

Now that I have your attention, the name of the play is “8,” and it was written by Dustin Black.  It recreates the 2010 federal trial challenging California’s Proposition 8.

Look for it with our new audiobooks, and enjoy.

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Filed under Art, Audiobooks, Authors, New Books

Pop-up books for grownups

Let’s celebrate creativity.  Flavorwire.com highlights some outrageous and delightful pop-up books for adults.

Take a look here for one kind, and here for a slide show of other kinds.

And here’s an alphabet book that would be so much fun to share with kids!  Click on the image below to take a look at this short video:

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Filed under Art, Books